The Determined Fox of “The Day of the Jackal” (1973)

An air of inevitability hangs about Fred Zinneman’s “The Day of the Jackal,” based on Frederick Forsyth’s book about an attempted assassination of Charles de Gaulle. (There was an attempt, but Forsyth’s book is almost entirely fiction.) The 1973 film adaptation is the espionage equivalent of a police procedural, and the would-be assassin’s preparations, juxtaposed

“The Ice Harvest”: Only morons are nice on Christmas

Welcome to my 12 Days of Christmas series! I thought I'd introduce some of my favorite anti-Christmas-spirit movies and a few proper Christmassy ones to celebrate what is actually my favorite holiday. (Food, pretty lights, and it lasts practically all month! It's really just the, um, people I don't like much.)

I’ll Kill Him and I’ll Eat Him: Food in Film Blogathon

This is my entry in the delicious Food in Film Blogathon, hosted by Silver Screenings and Speakeasy. Check out the many treats from Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3!   Let’s just start by acknowledging that Peter Greenaway‘s “The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover” is not for everyone. And that’s okay.

Real Love Confessions with William Powell & Jean Harlow

A contribution to the very cool Duo Double Feature Blogathon! Watching two stars as gifted and likeable as Willam Powell and Jean Harlow together is always a treat. Unfortunately, it's a treat we only got to see twice, as Harlow died terribly young, at 26, and at the height of her career.

Phantom of the Opera (1925): A Sense of Theatricality

The film has a complicated history, including a frosty reception upon its first (and second release). But even if the film weren’t importantly historically, with one of the first moments of moving technicolor (rather than hand-tinted film), it allows us to watch Chaney in all his sympathetic, oddball glory.